Lily wholesale and new arrival Dunkin sale

Lily wholesale and new arrival Dunkin sale

Lily wholesale and new arrival Dunkin sale
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No highlighting or underlining. Some minor wear, but overall very good condition. Pages are clean. Binding is tight. Ships directly from Amazon. Eligible for Prime or free super saver shipping.
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Sold by Julianna James and fulfilled by Amazon.
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Description

Product Description

NAMED  ONE OF THE BEST KIDS BOOKS OF THE YEAR by NPR  • New York Public Library • JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD SELECTION • GOODREADS CHOICE AWARDS

For readers who enjoyed Wonder and Counting by 7''s, award-winning author Donna Gephart crafts a compelling story about two remarkable young people: Lily, a transgender girl, and Dunkin, a boy dealing with bipolar disorder. Their powerful journey, perfect for fans of Wonder, will shred your heart, then stitch it back together with kindness, humor, bravery, and love.

Lily Jo McGrother, born Timothy McGrother, is a girl. But being a girl is not so easy when you look like a boy. Especially when you’re in the eighth grade.
 
Dunkin Dorfman, birth name Norbert Dorfman, is dealing with bipolar disorder and has just moved from the New Jersey town he’s called home for the past thirteen years. This would be hard enough, but the fact that he is also hiding from a painful secret makes it even worse. 
 
One summer morning, Lily Jo McGrother meets Dunkin Dorfman, and their lives forever change.

Review

One of YALSA''s Best Fiction for Young Adults
One of YALSA''s Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers
One of ALA''s Rainbow Book List -- GLBTQ Books for Children & Teens
Rainbow Awards Winner of Best Transgender Book 
An Indie Next Pick


"Gephart clearly has a lot of heart, and she tells their stories with compassion." — Kirkus

"A thoughtfully and sensitively written work of character-driven fiction that dramatically addresses two important subjects that deserve more widespread attention." — Booklist, starred review

“Gephart sympathetically contrasts the physical awkwardness, uncertainty, and longings of these two outsiders during a few tightly-plotted months, building to a crescendo of revelation…[A] valuable portrait of two teenagers whose journeys are just beginning.” — PW

"Gephart has written a story that will speak not just to one specific community, but to humanity as a whole... This would be a fantastic addition to any middle grade library collection, and is highly recommended for all ages." — VOYA
 
"Lily and Dunkin is a delight. Here’s a book for anyone who’s ever struggled with being different--or anyone who’s ever loved someone who bears the burden of difference. . . . Crucial, heart-breaking, and inspiring.” —Jennifer Finney Boylan, author of She’s Not There and Stuck in the Middle with You

About the Author

Donna Gephart’s award-winning novels are packed with humor and heart. They include Death by Toilet Paper; Olivia Bean, Trivia Queen; How to Survive Middle-School; and As if Being 12-3/4 Isn’t Bad Enough, My Mother Is Running for President! Donna is a popular speaker at schools, conferences, and book festivals. For reading guides, resources, writing tips, and more, visit donnagephart.com.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Girl
 
 
 
Lily Jo is not my name. Yet.
 
But I’m working on that.
 
That’s why I’m in the closet. Literally in my mom’s walk-in closet, with Meatball at my heels.
 
I scratch under Meatball’s chin, and his tiny pink tongue pokes out the side of his mouth. He’s adorable like that.
 
“Practice,” I tell Meatball. “Only six days until school starts.” I have to do this. I can’t. Have to. Can’t. I almost feel my best friend (okay, my only friend), Dare, push me toward the dresses.
 
Thinking about my plan for the first day of eighth grade makes my stomach drop, like I plunged over the crest of a roller coaster at Universal Studios. I’m sure not one other person going to Gator Lake Middle is dealing with what I am, probably not one other person in the entire state of Florida. Statistically, I know that’s not true, because I looked up a lot of information on the Internet, but it feels that way sometimes.
 
Meatball’s wagging his stubby tail so hard his whole body shakes. I wish the world were made of dogs. They love you one hundred percent of the time, no matter what.
 
“I’ve got one for you,” I tell Meatball as I pull a hanger from the rack. “The past, the present and the future all walk into a bar.”
 
I examine the summery red fabric. The tiny white flower print. I remember being with Mom when she bought this dress.
 
“Ready for the punch line?”
 
Meatball looks up at me with his big brown eyes, dark fur falling into them.
 
“It was tense.”
 
Silence.
 
Holding the dress to my chest, I say, “The past, the present and the future all walk into a bar. It was tense. Get it?”
 
Meatball tilts his head, as though he’s trying hard to understand. I scratch under his chin to let him know he’s such a good dog and I’m a total dork for telling a grammar joke to an animal.
 
Then I focus on the dress.
 
“These are lilies of the valley,” Mom said, pointing to the flowers when we were in the store. She held the dress to her cheek for a moment. “Those were my favorite flowers when I was growing up in Burlington, New Jersey. We had them in the garden in front of our house, near the pink azalea bushes. They smelled so good!”
 
I sniff the flowers now, as though the tiny, bell-shaped blossoms will smell like anything other than a dress. “I’m glad Dad’s at Publix,” I tell Meatball. “And Mom’s at her studio. Gives me time to put the first part of my plan into action. The practicing part.”
 
Half of me is so excited I could explode. It feels good to finally be doing this. The other half--where other people’s voices jam together in my brain--is terrified. Excited. Terrified. Yup, those are the right words.
 
I take off my pajamas and let the dress slide over my head and body. The silky lining feels smooth and soft against my skin. It’s hard to get the zipper up in the back. I consider going to Sarah’s room and asking for help, but decide to do it myself, even though I know she’d help me.
 
When I was little, I tried on one of Sarah’s old dresses and loved how it felt. How I felt in it. When Mom came home from work that day, she laughed and made me whirl and twirl. Even Dad laughed. Back then.
 
“What do you think?” I ask Meatball while I twirl, feeling the skirt of the dress drift up, then back down against my legs.
 
Meatball barks.
 
“I’ll take that as an approval.”
 
He barks again.
 
“Or you might have to pee.”
 
I slip into Mom’s sandals, barely believing my feet have now grown as large as hers, but they have.
 
In her full-length mirror, I see how the top of the dress bags out. If only I had something up there to fill it out, like Mom and Sarah do. I consider grabbing one of Mom’s bras and stuffing it with socks, to see how it would look. How it would feel.
 
A blaring car horn shatters my thoughts.
 
Meatball barks.
 
Scooping him under my arm, I put my face up close to his. “Come on. Let’s help Dad carry in the groceries.”
 
He licks my nose.
 
“Oh, Meatball, your breath is so bad.”
 
He nuzzles into my arm.
 
“But your heart is so good.” I kiss the top of his head. “Hope Dad remembered Pop-Tarts. Breakfast of champions.”
 
As we rush down the stairs, I hear Sarah’s bedroom door open behind me. When we reach the bottom, I let Meatball down, then hurry to the front door and fling it open.
 
Dad’s bent over, grabbing bags from the trunk of his car. I walk down the path to help. It’s so bright and sunny, I have to shield my eyes with my forearm, but I can make out the back of Dad’s T-shirt: The King Pines. I laugh out loud, realizing it was probably supposed to read The King Pins for one of the local bowling teams. Dad and his mom, Grandmom Ruth, run a T-shirt screen-printing business--We’ve Got You Covered--and sometimes orders get messed up.
 
Because Dad hates to waste anything, we all end up wearing his mistakes. My favorite was when a group of senior citizens asked Dad to make matching shirts for their upcoming vacation with the words The Bus Trippers. Dad goofed on the spacing, and the shirts ended up as The Bu Strippers. He had to redo the whole order. Those shirts got tossed, though, because Dad said there was no way any of us were wearing those rejects. It’s funny how one little letter can make such a big difference to the meaning.
 
Grandpop Bob, who started the business with Grandmom Ruth about a million years ago, used to say, “Words have the power to change the world. Use them carefully.”
 
After two years without him, I still miss him and his wise words.
 
I’m reaching my hand out to help when Dad turns toward me, each of his hands loaded with grocery bags.
 
I hold my breath, hoping Dad understands how much this means to me. Hoping that this time will be different, that--
 
“Timothy! What the hell are you doing?”
 
I deflate like a week-old balloon. Practicing, Dad. I’m practicing being me.
 
“You know the rule,” he says, letting out a huge breath. “You can’t be outside the house dressed like that.” Dad shifts the bags in his hands. “Where’s your mother?”
 
I let my arms fall slack to my sides. I wouldn’t have the energy to carry in the groceries now, if I wanted to. And I certainly don’t have the energy to answer Dad. He should know Mom’s at her yoga studio. It’s not my job to remind him of her schedule.
 
“Go back in the house, Tim.” Dad sounds like the air has leaked out of him, too. I hate that I caused it. “What if one of your classmates sees you? Imagine how they’d make fun of you when school starts. Get in now. Go.”
 
They already make fun of me, Dad.
 
He looks around. “Someone’s coming. Hurry.”
 
I glance along the sidewalk. Someone is coming. A boy, carrying a Dunkin’ Donuts bag and grooving to some music only he can hear. I love the way he doesn’t seem to care how he looks, dance-walking outside like that. He could be in a commercial for Dunkin’ Donuts: “happy-looking, doughnut-carrying boy.” I wish I felt that happy. I wish--
 
“Go!” Dad says.
 
I should walk back inside. Make it easier for Dad. Make it easier for myself.
 
But I don’t.

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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
272 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Paul W. Hankins
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Book That You Wish Had One More "AND" (so your name could appear there as a friend).
Reviewed in the United States on May 30, 2016
It''s the culture that keeps you from living the life one was born to live. It''s the closure that lets one begin to live again after a loss. And it''s the comfort of a limb one can climb out onto--climb out upon that reminds us that the phrase, "life and limb" takes... See more
It''s the culture that keeps you from living the life one was born to live. It''s the closure that lets one begin to live again after a loss. And it''s the comfort of a limb one can climb out onto--climb out upon that reminds us that the phrase, "life and limb" takes on new meaning depending upon how close one might be to a tree at the time. Gephart creates something very special in the characters of Tim (Lily) and Norbert (Dunkin) in this new-to-me-and-you but celebrated-by-early-readers within her new book for upper middle-grade readers (description says ten and up).

I read LILY AND DUNKIN in one day. This is not-so-odd as it is time for the annual push for Donalyn Miller (The Book Whisperer) and her #bookaday challenge. And I needed Gephart''s book to get me back into that swing of daily reading again after closing up a very busy school year. I started reading the book in the morning and I kept coming back all day long to "read just a little bit more." The description of the book tells you what to expect from a chance meeting of a transgender and a bi-polar character at the end of one summer going into a new school year.

What the description does NOT tell you--by way of humble brag--is that Gephart has written a new FREAK THE MIGHTY for a new generation of readers. Gephart works the symbiotic relationship well through the book even building in a little bit of tension for the reader as Dunkin violates some of the motifs of the familiar convention. But, what we do have--like the MG classic FTM--is a character defied by her own body matched up with a larger character having difficulty finding the words for the associated feelings that come of losing a loved one. But none of this is formulaic. What Gephart offers to readers is a story that is familiar to those who read symbiotic relationship, but, in LILY AND DUNKIN we get something that we don''t get in OF MICE AND MEN or FREAK THE MIGHTY.

We get parents. We get extended families. We get the pulling-toward and the pushback that comes of being in real-life families who struggle along with us. Who process the early buddings of a desire or a dream. Who champion our efforts. Who come to our aid when we call.

Comical and tender, this is the middle-grade book you are looking for this summer. Think GEORGE meets FREAK THE MIGHTY meets JOEY PIGZA, but be ready for a book that runs the gamut of emotions that come of real-life issues that are not overly-romanticized by Gephart. Th book also offers plenty of resources for more information on transgender-related issues as well as issues related to mental health. But, I''m really calling this a "January Book" (we''ll be talking about the book a lot again. . .in January). Early predictions from Mr. Hankins.
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Used to Write
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful narrative of two endearing and complex characters
Reviewed in the United States on December 3, 2016
I am thrilled that there are more and more young adult books available that positively address "issues" many young adults are facing on a daily basis-- mental illness in self and/or family, sexuality, gender identity, disabilities, self-esteem, etc. For many... See more
I am thrilled that there are more and more young adult books available that positively address "issues" many young adults are facing on a daily basis-- mental illness in self and/or family, sexuality, gender identity, disabilities, self-esteem, etc. For many children and young adults, it helps to read about characters who are facing the same issues as they are; it helps them feel more "normal."

Lily and Dunkin, the two protagonists after whom this book is titled, are two eighth graders who are dealing with a multitude of issues-- gender identity, family acceptance, mental illness in both self and family, moving, peer acceptance, bullying, self-acceptance, grief, and friendship-- yet the book does NOT read as "preachy" or as unrealistic in the number of social issues discussed in the book. Instead, Gephart breaks the reader''s heart as she characterizes both Lily and Dunkin, drawing the reader deeper and deeper into both the pain and joy each character feels at different parts in the narrative.

Nothing is perfect in the worlds of neither Lily nor Dunkin, which is what makes this novel so realistic. While both are accepted, and accept themselves, in some realms, they both face the opposite of acceptance in other ways. Both Lily and Dunkin are complex characters who are both incredibly typical and atypical at the same time.

This is a novel that should be available to all young adults. Even if a certain young reader isn''t struggling with bullying, gender identity, mental illness, grief, or friendship issues, I am 100% sure someone in their close circle IS dealing with at least one of those issues. Books like Lily and Dunkin help us all be more compassionate and understanding of those around us.
3 people found this helpful
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Mary Stelle
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Opened my eyes!
Reviewed in the United States on March 4, 2018
I am a mother of 1, step mom to 2 and grandmother of 5, one of whom is an eighth grader. I am lucky enough to have a job I love working with middle and high school students. So naturally I was fascinated by the synopsis of this book; eighth graders one transgender teen, one... See more
I am a mother of 1, step mom to 2 and grandmother of 5, one of whom is an eighth grader. I am lucky enough to have a job I love working with middle and high school students. So naturally I was fascinated by the synopsis of this book; eighth graders one transgender teen, one with bipolar disorder. I knew nothing of the manic phases of bipolar, or the challenges a transgender teen faces. This story made these challenges come alive for me! I found myself cheering each step forward, concerned with each step back. Along with discovering more about the main characters, it turns out everyone is hiding something! I feel experiencing this wonderfully written, sensitive story has opened my eyes as well as my heart. Understanding more, I hope to be more sensitive. As Maya Angelo said, " When we know better we do better".
5 people found this helpful
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Courtney Thomas
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
NOT OK!
Reviewed in the United States on September 6, 2019
If I could give zero stars I would! This book was WAAAY too of a mature topic for my 11 year old! Granted, I’m more upset at the school for making it required reading for a 6th grade class but the subject of this book is something that young kids still don’t completely... See more
If I could give zero stars I would! This book was WAAAY too of a mature topic for my 11 year old! Granted, I’m more upset at the school for making it required reading for a 6th grade class but the subject of this book is something that young kids still don’t completely understand.
5 people found this helpful
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Kathleen Bianchi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good book on friendship, transgender and bi-polar
Reviewed in the United States on August 12, 2016
I was greatly attracted to this book because of the bi-polar character. I am bi-polar and wanted to share this part of me with my 11yr l old grandchildren (doubtful my grandson is going to read it he is still working on a Anime book I sent him a year ago). My granddaughter... See more
I was greatly attracted to this book because of the bi-polar character. I am bi-polar and wanted to share this part of me with my 11yr l old grandchildren (doubtful my grandson is going to read it he is still working on a Anime book I sent him a year ago). My granddaughter suffers with mental health issues of her own and anytime I see something that I think will clarify her feeling for her I buy it. She has severe anxiety and OCD. I know what she is going through with the OCD because I have that also along with a few older family members. The actual story is very character driven and just wonderful. It really helps you understand what it feels like to be a transgender or a bi-polar sufferer. The progression of Lily and Dunkin''s is so interesting. Oh, and a subject I always like to see being touched upon was really a part of this book BULLYING. I sent my granddaughter 12 books this time so she hasn''t gotten to this one yet. I look forward to getting her feedback.
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Teresa K
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wow. Wow. Wow.
Reviewed in the United States on May 9, 2016
What a wonderful, beautifully written, personal novel about two such loveable and endearing characters. Lily and Dunkin is a must read for kids and parents alike. I was concerned that my 3rd and 4th graders would be too young to read it, but the issues are presented in such... See more
What a wonderful, beautifully written, personal novel about two such loveable and endearing characters. Lily and Dunkin is a must read for kids and parents alike. I was concerned that my 3rd and 4th graders would be too young to read it, but the issues are presented in such a humane way, that the question is not whether my kids can handle it, but rather, how I can use this opportunity to discuss these issues that have come to touch their generation in a much more profound way than they ever touched my generation.

Lily and Dunkin are as loveable as they are tortured by their situations, they are true heroes whose stories are both heartbreaking yet uplifting. I "binge-read" the book in one sitting, and I regret not having taken the time to savor every word, from the grammar-nerdy word fun to the dialogue and inner thoughts of these two courageous souls whose lives intertwine.
We are huge fans of Donna Gephart''s work, and I do believe this book will be one of the defining moments of her career. I was moved and inspired by this story, and I hope that those who read it will be too.
5 people found this helpful
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Kristen H.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
great characters, transgender and mental health issues
Reviewed in the United States on December 21, 2016
Are you going to the market? Get tissues. ALL THE TISSUES. For most of this book, I was feeling a solid four stars...great characters, transgender and mental health issues...but I started feeling bogged down in the middle. It was difficult to watch the... See more
Are you going to the market? Get tissues. ALL THE TISSUES.

For most of this book, I was feeling a solid four stars...great characters, transgender and mental health issues...but I started feeling bogged down in the middle. It was difficult to watch the friendship (non-relationship?) between Lily and Dunkin while he was being such a puke (well, a typical 8th grade boy, really).

But then...those last 100 pages. WHERE ARE THE TISSUES?! SO. MANY. FEELS.

Watching Lily grow braver and more comfortable in her own skin while watching Dunkin''s mental illness spiral out of control was such a gut-wrenching mix of emotions. Why is my heart beating so fast...IS THIS WHAT HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE FEELS LIKE?! And then the culminating scene concerning my favorite relationship--Lily and Bob the tree? SERIOUSLY...WHERE ARE ALL THE TISSUES?!

I love the moms in this one, and Lily''s sister and Dunkin''s grandmother are great, as well. Even Lily''s dad is sympathetic as he struggles with Lily''s new identity more than the rest of the family. The ending is a little too "happily ever after" to be completely realistic...but sometimes a little happily ever after feels just right. IMMEDIATELY going into my middle school library.
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David J. Spellman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Tremendously helpful to me as a Grandfather
Reviewed in the United States on February 23, 2017
Why on earth would I read this book? I''m 45 or more years older than the target audience. I loved it. The author writes with enormous heart and clarity; the characters and story-lines are all in 3D. This book helps me with the natural generation gap. Things were... See more
Why on earth would I read this book? I''m 45 or more years older than the target audience. I loved it. The author writes with enormous heart and clarity; the characters and story-lines are all in 3D. This book helps me with the natural generation gap. Things were extremely different when I was the age of Lily and Dunkin. For example, there were no transgender rights at that time; the few transgender individuals were treated as freak-show exhibits. The current news from DC, read when thinking of Lily, makes me deeply sad. One aspect of the book/characters that was brilliant beyond compare was the bipolarity of Dunkin/Norbert. That alone is the work of genius and sensitive depth.
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Top reviews from other countries

imalexnow
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 4, 2017
One of my favourite books for this year.
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Paula M. Schuck
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
My Kids LOVED this one!
Reviewed in Canada on July 25, 2019
This is a book that will never leave our home. I was hunting for an LGBTQ+ kind of youth read and this popped up in an Amazon search so I ordered it and my youngest, 14, was captivated from the second she started it. She told a young friend of hers all about it. Her friend...See more
This is a book that will never leave our home. I was hunting for an LGBTQ+ kind of youth read and this popped up in an Amazon search so I ordered it and my youngest, 14, was captivated from the second she started it. She told a young friend of hers all about it. Her friend is transitioning right now F to M and he bought it and read it too. Well done. Great little read in a very underserved category. The characters are extremely well rendered.
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